Citing ODH’s Summer Institutes

While I generally like to reserve posts for a wider audience, this is the second time I’ve come across this particular issue, and I’d like help from the masses. Every summer, the NEH’s Office for Digital Humanities funds a series of Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities. I’ve had the great fortune of attending one on computer simulations in the humanities, and teaching at one on network analysis for the humanities. I often find myself wishing I could cite one, as a whole, because of all the valuable experience and knowledge I received there. Unfortunately I have found no standard format to cite whole conferences, workshops, or summer institutes.

Our Great and Glorious Funders

I asked Brett Bobley, the ODH director, if he had any suggestions, but unfortunately he was at as much a loss as I. His reply: “Good question! I’d cite the URL (ex: http://is.gd/QnFs11 ). But we don’t have a format. Want to choose one & we’ll anoint it?” I’m not terribly familiar with citation styles, but I figured I’d try one out and see if the The DH Hive Mind had any better ideas. If so, please post in the comments. Ideally, the citation should include the URL of the grant, the PI(s), the date, the location, and the grant number (this is very important for tracking the impact of these summer institutes). While the PI is important, though, as the cited ideas do not come from the PI but rather the entire institute, I have chosen to place the institute name first.

“Network Analysis for the Humanities.” August 15-27, 2010. ODH Institute for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities: HT-50016-09. Tim Tangherlini, PI. https://securegrants.neh.gov/PublicQuery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=HT-50016-09.

“Computer Simulations in the Humanities.” June 1-17, 2011. ODH Institute for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities: HT-50030-10. Marvin J. Croy, PI. https://securegrants.neh.gov/PublicQuery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=HT-50030-10

What thoughts?

Zotpress is so cool.

So, you may have noticed this site has been overhauled over the past few days. The old WP theme really wasn’t doing it for me, so I decided to switch to the Great and Glorious Suffusion theme, which is more customizable than barrel of monkeys. The switch to the new theme opened up all sorts of real-estate for new content, and a brief look around the #DH blogosphere landed me on Zotpress.

Do you guys use Zotero? You should use Zotero. It’s a fantastic citation management program that snuggles up nice and close to your browser and turns it into a super research machine.

Dear Zotero, I ♥ you.

Anyway, Zotpress is a WordPress plugin that allows you to put the power of Zotero into your blog. Want to reference stuff? Easy! Want to make a list of most recently read items? Cake! (See the right side of this blog for that particular feature.) This is one of those plugins that I never thought I needed, but now that I have it I cannot imagine blogging efficiently without it.

For your reading pleasure, below is a list of some of super cool articles, courtesy of Zotpress:

[zotpress item=”34ABEHCE,D9SRGW5H,H52588XW,EF3KZ27G,HK6XQ3CI,42WF9AT7,SH7RT4P5″]

Who am I?

As this blog is still quite new, and I’m still nigh-unknown, now would probably be a good time to mark my scholarly territory. Instead of writing a long description that nobody would read, I figured I’d take a cue from my own data-oriented research and analyze everything I’ve read over the last year. The pictures below give a pretty accurate representation of my research interests.

I’ll post a long tutorial on exactly how to replicate this later, but the process was fairly straightforward and required no programming or complicated data manipulation. First, I exported all my Zotero references since last October in BibTeX format, a common bibliographic standard. I imported that file into the Sci² Tool, a data analysis and visualization tool developed at the center I work in, and normalized all the words in the titles and abstracts. That is, “applied,” “applies” and “apply” were all merged into one entity. I got a raw count of word use and stuck it in everybody’s favorite word cloud tool, Wordle, and the results of that is the first image below. [Post-publication note: Angela does not approve of my word-cloud. I can’t say I blame her. Word clouds are almost wholly useless, but at least it’s still pretty.]

I then used Sci² to extract a word co-occurrence network, connecting two words if they appeared together within the title+abstract of a paper or book I’d read. If they appeared together once, they were appended with a score of 1, if they appeared together twice, 2, and so on. I then re-weighted the connections by exclusivity; that is, if two words appeared exclusively with one another, they scored higher. “Republ” appeared 32 times, “Letter” appeared 47 times, and 31 of those times they appeared together, so their connection is quite strong. On the other hand, “Scienc” appeared 175 times, “Concept” 120 times, but they only appeared together 32 times, so their connection is much weaker. “Republ” and “Letter” appeared with one another just as frequently as “Scienc” and “Concept,” but because “Scienc” and “Concept” were so much more widely used, their connection score is lower.

Once the general network was created, I loaded the data into Gephi, a great new network visualization tool. Gephi clustered the network based on what words co-occurred frequently, and colored the words and their connections based on that clustering. The results are below (click the image to enlarge it).

These images sum up my research interests fairly well, and a look at the network certainly splits my research into the various fields and subfields I often draw from. Neither of these graphics are particularly sophisticated, but they do give a good at-a-glance notion of the scholarly landscape from my perspective. In the coming weeks, I will post tutorials to create these and similar data visualizations or analyses with off-the-shelf tools, so stay-tuned.